Recipes that help increase Phytoestrogens (and gluten free too!)

Sue Stevens

Sue has been in clinical practice for over 20 years and in that time, she has consulted and guided 1000’s of people through their healthcare journey. After studying for over 15 years, acquiring 3 post-graduate qualifications, Sue works to understand the nature of your health concerns, using traditional thinking and the best evidence-based information to create a holistic, manageable, and individualised treatment plan. Call today to step into the healthy, energetic version of yourself! Learn to live your best life!

Recipe for Vegan Banana Muffins

Ingredients:
*1 ½ cups Gluten Free flour of your choice
*1 teaspoon baking powder
*1 teaspoon baking soda
* ½ teaspoon fine sea salt *3-4 medium-large, very ripe bananas, mashed
* ½ cup sugar/honey/molasses
*1 tablespoon ground flax seeds mixed with 3 tablespoons water (or use 1 egg)
* 1/3 cup organic coconut oil, melted (or use butter), plus a little more to oil (or butter) the muffin tin *chocolate chips- optional

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 175 degrees C
2. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt; set aside.
3. In a large bowl, combine bananas, sugar, flax and water mixture, and melted coconut oil. Rub a standard muffin tin with melted coconut oil (or use paper liners). Fold the flour mixture into the banana mixture and mix until smooth. Fold in chocolate chips, if using
4. Bake in preheated oven for 20 to 25 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the centre comes out clean. Allow to cool slightly before removing from the pan

The Life-Changing Loaf of Bread

Makes 1 loaf Ingredients:
*1 cup / 135g sunflower seeds
*½ cup / 90g flax seeds *½ cup / 65g hazelnuts or almonds
*1 ½ cups / 145g rolled oats
*4 Tbsp. psyllium seed husks (3 Tbsp. if using psyllium husk powder)
*1 tsp. fine grain sea salt (add ½ tsp. if using coarse salt)
*1- 2 Tbsp. maple syrup (for sugar-free diets, use a pinch of stevia)
*1 ½ cups / 350ml water
* 3 tablespoons of coconut oil. Add cinnamon/nutmeg to taste, you may even like to add a ripe banana?

Directions:
1. In a flexible, silicon loaf pan combine all dry ingredients, stirring well. Whisk maple syrup, oil and water together in a measuring cup. Add this to the dry ingredients and mix very well until everything is completely soaked and dough becomes very thick (if the dough is too thick to stir, add one or two teaspoons of water until the dough is manageable). Smooth out the top with the back of a spoon. Let sit out on the counter for at least 2 hours, or all day or overnight. To ensure the dough is ready, it should retain its shape even when you pull the sides of the loaf pan away from it.
2. Preheat oven to 350°F / 175°C.
3. Place loaf pan in the oven on the middle rack and bake for 20 minutes. Remove bread from loaf pan, place it upside down directly on the rack and bake for another 30-40 minutes. Bread is done when it sounds hollow when tapped. Let cool completely before slicing (difficult, but important).
4. Store bread in a tightly sealed container for up to five days. Freezes well too – slice before freezing for quick and easy toast!

HEALTHY VEGETARIAN EDAMAME SALAD

This dish can be made to accompany a meal or have on its own! It looks very colourful (remember we eat with our eyes!) and tastes even better!

Ingredients:
* 1 cup of black rice – rinsed and drained * ¼ cup rice wine vinegar * 1 teaspoon sesame oil * I teaspoon caster sugar (I don’t usually put this in but feel free if you like) * 1 Lebanese cucumber – halved crossways and peeled into thin ribbons
* 454g packet of frozen edamame – thawed and peeled – (you can save time and buy already peeled) you will find these in the frozen vegetable section)
* 2 green onions – thinly sliced
* 1 avocado – diced
* 1 tablespoon of drained pickled ginger – roughly chopped
* 2 teaspoons of sesame seeds – toasted Wasabi Almonds
*2 tablespoons of tamari (wheat-free soy sauce – but you can use soy if not sensitive to gluten)
* 2 teaspoons of wasabi paste
* ½ cup of natural almond kernels

Directions:
1. Place rice in a large saucepan. Add 2 cups of cold water. Bring to the boil over high heat. Reduce heat to low. Cover. Simmer for 35mins or until rice is just tender and the liquid has absorbed. Remove from heat. Stand covered for 5 minutes. Fluff rice with a fork, cool for 15 minutes.
2. Meanwhile combine vinegar, sesame oil, and sugar (optional) in a bowl. Add cucumber. Toss to combine. Set aside until required, tossing continually.
3. Make wasabi almonds. Whisk tamari and wasabi paste together in a small bowl adding extra wasabi to taste. Add almonds. Stir to coat. Set aside for 15 minutes to allow the flavours to develop. Reserve 2 teaspoons of tamari liquid. Preheat oven to 200C/ 18C fan-forced. Line a baking tray with baking paper. Spoon almonds on prepared tray. Roast for minutes or until the almonds are toasted and the liquid has evaporated. Set aside to cool. Roughly chop.
4. Place cucumber mixture, reserved tamari mixture, edamame, onion and rice in a large bowl. Season with pepper. Toss to combine.
5. Spoon rice mixture onto a serving platter. Top with avocado, ginger and almonds. Sprinkle with sesame seeds. Serve!

 

 

 

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Published on:13 Jan, 2020

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